Applied Ruminant Nutrition, ARSC 470 (3 credits)                                                                         

I.  InstructorDr. Doug W. King

Office:  DSU, Ag Building, West Campus                  

Phone:  483-2193           Fax:  483-2055             

e-mail:  doug.king@dsu.nodak.edu

Class Time:  As pre-described by the Fall or Spring schedule

Office Hours:  Open door policy, however appointments are recommended.

Required Text:  none 

 

Supplemental Material:  Cheeke, Peter R. 1999, Applied Animal Nutrition, 2nd Ed., available in bookstore.   “Feedstuffs” Annual Reference Issues and Tables.  National Research Council Books and Tables.  CowBytes, KSU, Brill Formulation, and MSRB Ration Formulation Software.

“Animal Feeding and Nutrition”, 9th Ed. Jurgens, M. H., 2002, Kendall/Hunt Publ. Co.   

 

 

II.  Course Description:

 

Principles of feeding various classes of beef cattle (and occasionally sheep, elk and bison) will be discussed and practical problems will be assigned to the students.   This class is concerned with the proper care and feeding of ruminants and is intended to build upon the animal nutrition and feedstuff nutrient knowledge base provided by ARSC 123.  And provide experience in utilizing that knowledge base in practical feeding situations.

 

Objectives

This class is intended to:

a)  Help develop a basic understanding of nutrients, animal nutrition, comparative digestive anatomy, animal requirements, common feeds, feedstuff characteristics and feeding.  Students will become familiar with principles of formulating balanced total mixed rations (TMR’s) and balancing of rations with software programs.

b)  Provide the student with information for present use and future reference on nutrient content of typical feedstuffs, tables of animal requirements, guidance for utilizing ration balancing software, practical feeding articles and examples of poor and properly balanced rations.

 

As this is an upper level class with a practical application that is a result of student requests for such a class.  The students themselves will as a group come to a consensus on class content and grading procedures within the boundaries set down by the instructor at the first meeting.

 

III.  Learning Outcomes:

A.      Institutional Student Learning Outcomes:  Students will:

1.       Develop higher order and critical thinking skills through:  discussions and projects focusing on feeds and practical feeding management.

2.       Develop basic academic success skills particularly with regards to:  communication, technology and organization and study skills needed to cope with the volumes of information on animal requirements and feeding and computer balancing of rations.

3.       Develop global, liberal arts and academic values and knowledge:  the impact of animal feeding on society in general and world issue impacts on American beef trade and feeding will be discussed in class.  Examples of international issues currently affecting American beef producers include but are not limited to:  BSE, country or origin labeling of beef products, protests against antibiotic use in animal production in Europe, the large cattle numbers in Brazil and Argentina, and the recent rise in the numbers and interest in beef feedlots in Australia and South America.

4.       Students will be exposed towards humanities in this course mainly due to the perceptions and fears of consumers towards the foods they are purchasing and the feed chain producing their foods.  Again, BSE and antibiotics in animal feeding are currently the hot issues here.

5.       Develop discipline specific knowledge and skills including: a basic understanding of nutrients, animal nutrition, comparative digestive anatomy, animal requirements, common feeds, feedstuff characteristics and feeding.  Students will become familiar with principles of formulating balanced rations and balancing of rations with hand calculations and software programs. Develop work and career preparation skills:  Animal industry demands a working knowledge of nutrients, animal nutrition, comparative digestive anatomy, animal requirements, common feeds, feedstuff characteristics, ration balancing and feeding.

6.       Health and wellness will be discussed with regards to livestock production and consumer health.  Both through the safety of the agricultural products produced and human eating habits.  Here issues such as feed additives and food handling, country of origin labeling etc. are important as are trends or fads such as the Atkins diet.  Consumer demands and concerns have altered how beef is produced in North America.  For example in the 50’s consumers wanted small cuts of meat which lead to little boxy beef animals.  And only 1 new feed additive has been approved in the last 10 to 15 years by the FDA.  Encourage the personal development of each student in order to maximize this potential for productive careers and the ability to embrace a life-long learning model:  Special guests from industry, the NDSU Research Station and NDSU Extension will enhance the learning of the students plus give the students opportunities to interact with professionals in animal science.

 

B.      Agricultural Studies Program Student Learning Outcomes;  Students will:

1.       Demonstrate a basic proficiency and understanding of nutrients, animal nutrition, comparative digestive anatomy, animal requirements, common feeds, feedstuff characteristics and feeding.  Students will become familiar with principles of formulating balanced rations and balancing of rations with software programs

2.       Demonstrate proper and effective written and oral communication skills through assignments.

3.       Principles and practices learned in this class are intended to further those previously covered in ARSC Feeds and Feeding 123, and help the student in other animal and range science classes such as: Herd Health, Range Science, and Grazing Ecology among others.

4.       Computer technology will be utilized in lab giving students valuable practice not only in animal science but with computer technology as well.

 

C.      Student Learning Outcomes:

Students should develop a proficiency in:

1.       Recognizing animal requirements and deficiencies in feeds, rations, and feeding programs.

2.       Be able to identify and suggest feeds and total mixed rations (TMR’s) that could correct the nutritional imbalances.

3.       Identify unbalanced and balanced rations.

4.       Formulate basic balanced beef cattle rations with the use of a computer.  Students will demonstrate their proficiency in balancing rations and providing practical solutions to real world feeding problems through-out the class.  Students will be given a final group practical problem that they will have to provide a suitable solution(s) for in able to pass the class.

5.       Students should gain more understanding and appreciation of world events that shape how we produce and market livestock.

6.       Students should also gain an appreciation and understanding of how human fears and concerns whether real or merely perceived impact how livestock is handled and produced in this country and abroad.

 

Class Policy:  Respectful and helpful attitude towards guests, faculty, and fellow students along with regular attendance is expected and graded as part of class participation.  Students are also expected to respect University property and obey all computer lab rules and policy when in class.  Those that do not will have their grades reduced by up to 10% (class participation points) and/or may be asked to leave the classroom, lab, or computing facilities.

 

Students who feel that they may have a special need or concern that has to be addressed in order for them to perform to their potential in this class are strongly encouraged to communicate this to the instructor at the beginning of the semester.  All practical efforts to accommodate student special needs will be made.

 

IV.  Course Content Outline:

                                   

Tentative Course Content Outline Spring 2006:

Often a problem will be presented on Tuesday and then be handed in/discussed Thursday of the same week.

Date

Topic

Assignment or Lab

Spring 2006

Tentative Schedule for Applied Ruminant Nutrition

 

Week 1

Invited Guests will show up on short notice and change the schedule.

 

T Jan 10

Intro to Class/Instructor, Fill-out class objectives form, Students will also fill out tentative desired schedule(s) and grading proc.

Discuss / Student Objectives

TR Jan 12

Chronological History of Cattle Industry in USA

Hand-out

 

 

 

Week 2

 

 

M Jan 16

Holiday, Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

T Jan 17

Review Nutrients, Nutrient Quiz handed out

Last Day to Add

TR Jan 19

BCS Video

Or Nutrient ppt

Week 3

 

 

T Jan 24

Finish Elanco (Rumensin) BCS video

 

TR Jan 26

Video cont. Nutrient Quiz handed in

Quiz

 

 

 

Week 4

 

 

T Jan 31

Review Balancing rations or Drought & Feeding Cattle

NDSU-extension guest?

TR Feb 2

Review Balancing rations or Feeding Videos

 

 

 

 

Week 5

 

 

T Feb 7

Rumen Story, Rations and Ration Step-ups

CowBytes

TR Feb 9

Bunk Management Video

CowBytes

 

 

 

Week 6

 

 

T Feb 14

Feeding Calves

ppt. and Problem

TR Feb 16

Feeding Calves

 

Week 7

 

 

M Feb 20

President's Day Holiday

 

T Feb 21

Feed Additives

 

TR Feb 23

Implants

Guest, Fort Dodge?

 

 

 

Week 8

Mid-Term Week

 

T Feb 28

Managing Cattle

guest

TR Mar 2

Finishing rations

Last Day to Drop, Mar 3

 

 

 

Week 9

2nd 1/2 of Semester; GPS Workshops

 

T Mar 8

Replacement Heifers and Stockers

ppt. and Problem

TR Mar 10

Replacement Heifers and Stockers

 

 

 

 

Week 10

Spring Break

 

T Mar 14

Spring Break

 

TR Mar 16

Spring Break

 

 

Spring Break

 

Week 11

 

 

T Mar 21

Surprise Beef Problem to be solved in small groups.

ppt

TR Mar 23

Beef problem

 

 

 

 

Week 12

 

 

T March 28

Feeding Cows

guest

TR March 30

Year in Nutrition for the Cowherd (4 Stages)

ppt

 

 

 

Week 13

 

 

T April 4

Range Nutrition, Rumen Story, Substitution vs Supplementation

ppt, and Problem

TR April 6

BCS

 

 

 

 

Week 14

 

 

T April 11

Feeding Sale bulls

 

TR April 13

Feeding the old bull

 

 

Good Friday / Easter Break

 

Week 15

Monday, Easter Break

 

T April 18

Feedlot Visit

Road Trip

TR April 20

 

 

Week 16

 

 

T April 26

Metabolic disorders (Student group presentations)

Presentation(s)

TR April 28

Presentations

 

 

 

 

Week 17

 

 

T May 2

Present problem solutions.  Solutions will have to sensible and

 

TR May 4

practical in order for the student to pass the class.

Hand-in Beef Problem

Week 18

 

 

Final Exams

 

 

Sat May 13

Commencement

 

 


 

V.  Teaching Strategies:

 

This class is an advanced but practical ruminant nutrition class concerned with feeding, rations, and nutritional/metabolic problem solving.  A large portion of the class will involve computer and lab work with practical problems and real world experiences provided by the instructors field experience with and national feed company and the input of experts in the beef nutrition area.  The problems will be preceded and supplemented with powerpoint presentations, videos, guest lectures, and always, group discussions.

 

For much of the beginning of this class student progress and grades will only be limited by their own initiative.  Initially the only way to get a bad grade is to not try and do the work.  This instructor will work with each and every student personally to ensure that the problems presented to them are completed with satisfactory results prior to the assignments being turned in.  Initially this class will be learning and results orientated.  However, towards the end of the semester practical ruminant problems (both individual and group) and 1 group presentation that will be the sole responsibility of the student’s with-out instructor coaching and will determine roughly 30% to 40% of the grade.

 

1.       Discussion, Demonstrations, and PowerPoint slide presentations: 

2.       Practical nutrition problems/situations will be presented and discussed, typically on Tuesday, and student solutions presented in class (typically the following Thursday) and then written solutions will be handed in for grading. 

3.       As part of the final lab exam students will form groups, be given a practical feeding problem.  Groups will present their solutions to the problem during the final week of classes.  The problem may involve ration balancing as well as associated recommendations.  The rations and recommendations need to be practical and sensible in order for each student of the group to pass the class.  

4.       Outside information, contacts with animal specialists and web searches will also be part of the class.  Typical sources of information generally include:  Journal of Animal Science, Society for Range Management, Canadian Journal of Animal Science, Feedstuffs newspaper and others.

 

As this is an upper level class with a practical application that is a result of student requests for such a class.  The students themselves will as a group, come to a consensus on class content and grading procedures within the boundaries set down by the instructor at the first meeting

 

VI.  Assessment of student’s performance:

 

Grading:  letter grades are based on a percentage of the total points possible in class for assignments, problems, and presentations in class plus outside research. 

 

A          Awarded to students that demonstrate superior proficiency on exams, assignments, labs, and hand assignments in on time (refer to late policy below), show extra initiative on assignments and projects.  These outcomes will be demonstrated by obtaining 90% or above of the total potential class points.

 

B          Awarded to students that demonstrate a thorough proficiency on exams, assignments, labs, and hand the majority of assignments in on time.   A designation of a B grade will be given to students obtaining 80 to 89.5% of the total potential class points.

 

C          Awarded to students who demonstrate a proficiency with the majority of examinations, labs, and hand in most of their assignments in a timely fashion. A designation of a C grade will be given to students obtaining 70 to 79.5% of the total potential class points.  

 

D          Awarded to students that demonstrate a poor understanding of feed, feedstuff, and nutrition terms and feeding principles, and do not turn in assignments in a timely fashion and do not appear willing to try to improve their knowledge.  A designation of a D grade will be given to students obtaining 60 to 69.5% of the total potential class points.  

 

F          Awarded to students that demonstrate a poor understanding of feed, feedstuff, and nutrition terms and feeding principles and do not appear willing to try to improve their knowledge and/or put in the necessary effort to pass this class.  A designation of a D grade will be given to students obtaining 50 to 59.5% of the total potential class points.  

 

“Class participation” (and a superior work ethic) will account to 10% of a student’s grade.

 

Grading will be influenced by class consensus within guidelines set down by the instructor.

 

The majority of the grade will based on performance on ruminant nutrition problems and ration requests mainly done during regular class time.  Typically problems will be assigned on a Tuesday and be due that Thursday or the following week (for more involved problems).  Usually potential solutions will be presented and discussed in class and the problems/solutions dissected.  Students may play the part of clients and present other students with problems that need solutions.  There will be 1 student group presentation regarding metabolic disorders of livestock.  The final ruminant nutrition (group) problem will need to be done satisfactorily in order for the student to pass.

 

Late Policy:  Unless prior agreement has been reached with the instructor, assignments and labs will be penalized 25% of their original face value for every week (or fraction of) late, and will not be accepted after they are over 2 weeks late.

 

            This instructor operates under 2 basic learning assumptions.  1)  Students want to learn and  2)  Students at the University level are responsible for their own learning.  Hence, it is expected by this instructor that students that have to miss class for legitimate reasons will on their own pick up assignments and materials they have missed and complete these and turn them in a timely fashion.  This instructor will NOT track down students that are missing assignments.  It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that all projects and assignments in this class are turned in on time.

 

Attendance Policy:      DSU Policy Manual states that:  “Students are expected to attend all scheduled classes and labs as published in the official class schedule.  Any regular deviation from this general policy must be approved by the instructor and the college dean.

            Student excuses fall in the following categories: academically related (field trips) or institutionally sponsored activities (athletics, tours, etc.) will be excused.  The advisor or coach will prepare an excuse sheet and the students involved must provide this sheet to their instructors prior to the activity, if possible.

            All other absences must be cleared with each instructor.  It is the instructor’s decision to determine if the absence is excused or unexcused.

            All students have the responsibility of personally contacting their instructor’s concerning their missing work for any absence from class.

            The catalog provides specific guidelines for time periods in which classes may be added, dropped, or for students to withdraw from school.”